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Public Companies with Broad-based Stock Options: Corporate Performance from 1992-1997

Authors: Blasi, Joseph; Kruse, Douglas; Sesil, James; Kroumova, Maya
Product Type: Policy and Issue Reports
Source: The National Center for Employee Ownership
Publication Year: 2002

[This document has not yet been rated] 1127 views

This report compares the performance of corporations that offer their employees broad-based stock option plans to those that do not offer their employees broad-based stock option plans.

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The Impact of Employee Involvement and Group Incentives on Performance in UK High Technology Establishments

Author: Sesil, James
Product Type: Research Notes / Working Papers; Books / Book Chapters
Source: Center for HR Strategy, Rutgers University
Publication Year: 1999

[This document has not yet been rated] 1053 views

There is increasing recognition that the way in which the employment relationship is structured has an impact on the success of an enterprise.

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Broad-Based Stock Options and Firm Productivity: Do They Promote the Formation of Organizational Capital?

Authors: Peng Lin, Yu; Sesil, James
Product Type: Research Notes / Working Papers
Source: Center for HR Strategy, Rutgers University
Publication Year: 2006

[This document has not yet been rated] 946 views

Does stock options program, especially the one for rank-and-file employees (Broad-Based stock options program), improve firm productivity? By using a unique data set containing the exact start dates of Broad-Based stock options program, this work demonstrates that stock options program indeed improves firm productivity.

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Broad-Based Employee Stock Options - A Union-Nonunion Comparison

Authors: Kroumova, Maya; Sesil, James; Kruse, Douglas; Blasi, Joseph
Product Type: Journal Articles
Source: Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations, Volume 11, Elsevier
Publication Year: 2002

[This document has not yet been rated] 915 views

Until recently, stock options were primarily reserved for senior executives and selected managers in most American corporations. In the last decade or so, however, stock options have become part of the compensation package for an increasing number of rank-and-file employees.

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Broad-Based Stock Options and Company Performance: What the Research Tells Us

Working Paper Series in Human Resource Management

Authors: Blasi, Joseph; Kruse, Douglas; Sesil, James; Kroumova, Maya
Product Type: Research Notes / Working Papers
Source: The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers
Publication Year: 2010

[This document has not yet been rated] 885 views

The authors found that companies with broad-based stock option plans (here, defined as those where most nonmanagement employees receive option grants) had statistically significant higher productivity levels and annual growth rates than public companies in general and their peers.

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Broad-Based Employee Stock Options in the U.S.: Company Performance and Characteristics

Authors: Sesil, James; Kroumova, Maya; Kruse, Douglas; Blasi, Joseph
Product Type: Research Notes / Working Papers
Source: Center for HR Strategy, Rutgers University
Publication Year: 2005

[This document has not yet been rated] 881 views

This paper analyses data on 490 companies with broad-based stock option plans, matched to data from Compustat in order to compare their characteristics and performance to that of other public companies.

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Broad-Based Stock Options: Before and After the Market Downturn

Authors: Sesil, James; Kroumova, Maya
Product Type: Research Notes / Working Papers
Source: Center for HR Strategy, Rutgers University
Publication Year: 2005

[This document has not yet been rated] 858 views

We examine labor productivity in small, medium, and large firms that broadly distribute stock options under starkly different market conditions - during the bull (1995-1997) and bear (2000-2002) stock markets. We find greater labor output in both upward and downward markets in all firm size categories, with the exception of small firms in a declining market, where the productivity is also greater, but the statistical significance of the result is weak.

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Intellectual Capital, Monitoring and Risk: What Predicts the Adoption of Broad-Based Employee Stock Options?

Authors: Kroumova, Maya; Sesil, James
Product Type: Research Notes / Working Papers
Source: Center for HR Strategy, Rutgers University
Publication Year: 2005

[This document has not yet been rated] 848 views

In this paper, we use empirical analysis to analyze company characteristics associated with the adoption and maintenance of broad-based stock option plans. Overall, our results provide support to the claim that higher monitoring costs prompt firms to adopt and maintain employee stock option plans.

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An assessment of employee ownership in the United States with implications for the EU

Authors: Blasi, Joseph; Kruse, Douglas; Sesil, James; Krouiinova, Maya
Product Type: Journal Articles
Source: International Journal of Human Resource Management 14:6
Publication Year: 2003

[This document has not yet been rated] 837 views

There is a significant gap in the incidence and development of employee ownership between the European Union (EU) and the US when both sectors are examined.

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Does Employee Ownership Enhance Firm Survival?

Authors: Park, Rhokeun; Kruse, Douglas; Sesil, James
Product Type: Research Notes / Working Papers
Source: Employee Participation, Firm Performance and Survival Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory and Labor-Managed Firms, Volume 8,3-33, Elsevier
Publication Year: 2004

[This document has not yet been rated] 800 views

Research on employee ownership has focused on questions of productivity, profitability, and employee attitudes and behavior, while there has been little attention to the most basic measure of performance: survival of the company. This study uses data on all U.S. public companies as of 1988, following them through 2001 to examine how employee ownership is related to survival.

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